Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

TOBACCO REPORT 

J95J-f952 




THE BULLETIN 
of the 
'^ North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. V. Ballentink, Conniiissionrr 
Number 126 April, 1952 



TABLE OF CONTENTS I 

Page . 
T()l)ac('() Outlook for 1!),)'2 _ 4 , 

North Carolina Burley Toljacco 8 

North CaroHna Tobacco Crops, 1<)19-1!).51 .._ l,*? 

State Siimiiiary, 1 9.3 1 - 1 Oo-i _._ 14 

North Carohna Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report 

For Season l!)i>l-l<)5^ 16 

Sununary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales l!).51-5'-2 18 

North Carolina Tobacco Allotments, 19.5^2 _.__ 19 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses _. 21 

Turkish Tobacco in North Carolina 28 

Outlets for U. S. Tobacco (Chart) Back Cover 






THE BULLETIN 

of fhe 

North Caroline Department' of Agriculture 

L. "W Halijcntink, ('i)iNnns.fii)iirr 
Number 126 April, 1952 



FOREWORD 

The third annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. 
Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of Markets, 
in cooperation with the U.S.D.A. under the Research 
and Marketing Act. 

Credit for information contained herein is due the 
Cooperative Crop Reporting Service of the North Caro- 
lina and United States Departments of Agriculture, the 
ILS.D.A. Tobacco Branch and the Field Service of the 
Production and Marketing Administration. 

North Carolina produces 68 per cent of all the flue- 
cured tobacco grown in the United States and manu- 
facturers in the State pay into the Federal Treasury 52 
])er cent of the total excise tax paid on tobacco products. 




Commissioner of AcfriculUire 



Foi- free distribution by tlie Tobacco Section. Markets nivision. North 
Carolina Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



Tobacco Outlook for 1952 

On November 28, 1951, the Secretary of Agriculture pro- 
claimed the flue-cured and hurley tobacco acreage allotments 
for 1952. 

Flue-cured allotments were 1,130,000 acres. Burley allotments 
were 475,000 acres. These allotments are about the same as 
were in effect for 1951. As is customary, the Secretary held a 
small acreage in reserve for establishing allotments for new 
growers on farms which have grown no flue-cured or burley 
tobacco during the past five years. 

The system of allotting quotas has been in effect continuously 
since 1940, and has been voted upon each three years. 

Quota Election 

Growers will have to vote again on quotas during 1952. The 
law requires that they vote for three-year control, one-year con- 
trol or to reject quotas. The marketing quota will be in effect 
only if approved by at least two-thirds of the growers voting. 
Government price support at 90 per cent of parity is mandatory 
when quotas are in effect, but no price support can be made 
available on the 1952 crop if quotas are disapproved. 

The allotted acreage of flue-cured tobacco is expected to pro- 
duce 1,357 million pounds, while burley allotments should pro- 
duce 591 million pounds. 

The purpose of the quota system is to ensure production of a 
sufficient amount of tobacco to meet the domestic and foreign 
demand, without creating shortages and surpluses which cause 
serious price fluctuations. The success of the system can be 
appreciated by a study of the production, disappearance and 
price pattern over the past ten years. 

The tobacco prosperity of North Carolina and other Southern 
states is so closely tied with world affairs that even elections 
in foreign countries can have their effect on the size of future 

crops. 

The recent election in Britain promises to affect our future 
crop planning. Honorable Winston Churchill announced soon 
after taking office that the British would be forced to curtail 
imports of foods and other items by one billion dollars during 
1952. A later announcement declared that the imports of flue- 
cured tobacco would be reduced 43 per cent from the 1951 level. 
(As this Bulletin went to press a plan was being worked out 



whereby British purchases of American tobacco could be main- 
tained at or near normal levels in 1952. ) 

The Communist conquest of China cut off one of our good 
flue-cured customers. The independence given the Philippines 
had an adverse effect on our exports of leaf tobacco. 

How will these events react on the crop next year? 

Export Situation 

For a basis to analyze our export prospects, let's look at the 
world conditions that prevailed during 1951, when we exported 
433 million pounds of flue-cured to 40 different countries of the 
world. Burley exports, always small by comparison to flue-cured, 
accounted for 31 million pounds to 11 different countries. 

During the past year, our flue-cured exports increased to 
Britain, Australia, Belgium, Sweden and Indonesia . . . while 
we suffered losses in exports of flue-cured to Western Germany, 
the Philappines, Ireland and Denmark^ 




A Federal tobacco grader examines a pile of tobacco in the pre.sence 
of the grower. To get the top dollar a farmer .should be at the ware- 
hou.se when his tobacco is graded and sold. 



Great Britain, our best customer for flue-cured tobacco, pur- 
chased about 150 million pounds out of the 1951 crop. Despite 
Mr. Churchill's announcement of curtailed purchases this year, 
it is believed that because of its dependence on tobacco as a 
revenue producer to run the government, England will still 
afford a good market for our tobacco. 

Consumption of tobacco products in England showed an in- 
crease during 1951, while their stocks of American flue-cured 
tobacco were at a very low level. Their increased purchases 
from last year's crop did not keep pace with increased consump- 
tion. Therefore, it will take substantial purchases in 1952 to 
bring British stocks of American leaf into a more balanced rela- 
tionship with consumption. 

While Western Germany was in the loss column for our 1951 
exports, economic recovery thei^e has shown marked impro\'e- 
ment in the past several months, and this area will likely pick 
up any losses we have in exports to the United Kingdom. 

China, the Philippines and the Far East, as a whole, seem 
to be practically lost as substantial customers of our tobacco 
until conditions, both political and economic, improve. 

Regardless of the ever-changing political picture in the world, 
the outlook is for a slight increase over the 433 million pounds 
of flue-cured and the 31 million pounds of burley exported dur- 
ing 1951. 

Domestic Situation 

The domestic use of flue-cured reached an all-time high of 
751 million pounds last year, while burley disappearances were 
530 million pounds. The large domestic uses of flue-cured and 
burley were t)rought about by increased sales of cigarettes. 

The consumption of cigarettes was 412 billion pieces in 1951. 
compared with 392 billion in 1950. This increase is expected to 
continue during 1952, and as long thereafter as economic condi- 
tions remain good, and the high wage ratio prevails in oui' in- 
dustrial plants. 

The excise tax on cigarettes was increased on November 1 , 
1951, from seven to eight cents per package, and the higher rate 
will continue in efl'ect until April 1, 1954. Then it will revert to 
seven cents, according to the 1951 legislation. 

The tax on smoking and chewing tobacco was reduced from 
eighteen to ten cents per pound on the same date. These ad- 
ju.stments are not expected to affect the consumption of cigar- 
ettes or smoking tobacco much either way. However, the reduc- 



tion in the tax on smoking and chewing tobacco may improve 
the demand for medium and low grades of leaf that normally go 
into this type product. 

Stocks Position 

Combining the exports and domestic uses of flue-cured, we 
get a total disappearance of 1,184 million pounds in 1951. While 
our production was 1,412 million pounds, the Flue-Cured Stabili- 
zation Corporation received only 140 million pounds. The rela- 
tively small amount going into Stabilization indicates a strong 
market for 1952. 

The burley situation is not so good. The 1951 crop amounted 
to about 600 million pounds of producer tobacco which sold for 
.$52.00 per hundred pounds. The burley stabilization pool re- 
ceived 91 million pounds to be added to present holdings of 
around 30 million pounds. Indications are that burley carry- 
over stocks will amount to about 1,300 million pounds, which 
should weaken the market demand during the 1952 season. 

Price Outlook 

Flue-cured was supported at $50.70 per hundred pounds dur- 
ing the 1951 season, while burley was supported at $49.80 per 
hundred. 

The level of price support is determined at 90 per cent of 
parity, as of June for flue-cured and September for burley. 

A little decline in the parity index in the past few months, 
(prices paid by farmers, interest, taxes and wage rates), indi- 
cates that the support prices will be slightly less for the 1952 
crop. The reduction in parity is likely because the adjusted base 
price, figured under the formula, will be lower than last year. 

One of the largest factors in determining the auction average 
price of a given crop is the quality of the tobacco produced. Last 
year, lower and medium quality tobacco was the main reason 
for the lower auction average price. If the grade distribution is 
more nearly average for a normal crop, growers should receive 
a higher auction price than the $53.00 received in 1951, for both 
flue-cured and burley. 



North Carolina Burley Tobacco 

The history of tobacco in Western North Carolina goes back 
to reconstruction days when many farmers in that part of the 
State and in Eastern Tennessee began experimenting with the 
production of bright tobacco. Seed for their crops were obtained 
from the flue-cured sections of the Carolinas and Virginia, but 
it soon became apparent that bright tobacco was not adapted 
to the soil and climate of this mountainous area. Leading grow- 
ers began to change to the burley type of tobacco then being 
grown in Kentucky, and soon after the turn of the century most 
growers had made this change. The production of burley tobacco 
continued to expand until today it is a very important source 
of income for many farm families in Western North Carolina. 

Burley Acreage 

The total burley acreage in North Carolina has almost doubled 
since 1940, although allotments have fluctuated considerably 
during the past twelve years. The State has lost several hundred 
acres of burley allotment through the failure each year on the 
part of some growers to plant all of their individual allotments. 

The following table shows a comparison of allotted and plant- 
ed acreage in several of the larger producing counties in North 
Carolina: 







194« 




l',45 


19 


(1 


1951 




Allolled 


Planted 


Allolted 


Planted 


Allulted 


Planted 


Allotted 


Counties 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acre, 


Alleghany 


8U 


50 


229 


250 


232 


1G6 


2(i4 


Ashe 


482 


410 


1392 


1100 


121)9 


775 


1399 


Avery 


43 


35 


llfi 


90 


HI 


81 


129 


Buncombe 


1314 


9U0 


2795 


1490 


209(i 


1513 


2303 


Clay 


40 


30 


7S 


80 


77 


53 


91 


Graham 


129 


95 


298 


:!00 


323 


255 


385 


Haywood 


883 


800 


17,58 


ItidO 


1427 


1134 


1,594 


Jackson 


3(i 


20 


S4 


(iO 


10(i 


71 


125 


Madison 


3159 


2750 


5125 


4(iOO 


3548 


3115 


3929 


Mitchell 


265 


270 


G(i3 


450 


598 


384 


063 


Watauga 


389 


300 


1057 


11.50 


9(i2 


725 


1068 


Yancey 


SOS 


700 


1G27 


1550 


1385 


1085 


1558 



From 1940 through 1951, burley tobacco growers have aver- 
aged planting only about three-fourths of their total allotted 
acreage. The 1950 burley allotment totaled 12,480 acres, and 
only 9,564 acres were planted, leaving more than 2,900 acres 
unplanted. This means that approximately 2.5 million dollars 
of farm income was lost by North Carolina burley growers 
in 1950. In 1951 about 2,300 acres of the allotment were not 
planted. The tobacco from this 2,300 acres would have return- 
ed the growers about 2 million dollars, based on the prices re- 
ceived for the 1951 crop. As a result, North Carolina burley 



tobacco growers, over a period of just two years, lost an op- 
portunity to earn around 4.5 million dollars by failing to plant 
their allotted acreage of tobacco. 

The total burley quota for 1952 has been set at 591,000,000 
pounds, which is a slight increase over the quota of 580,000,000 
pounds for 1951. The burley poundage quota converted, resuhs 
in 475,000 acres for 1952 as compared with 472,000 total acres 
allotted for 1951. But even with a slight increase in over-all 
burley acreage, North Carolina's allotment for 1952 is only 
1,3,359 acres as compared with 13,916 acres in 1951. This is a 
loss of 557 acres in allotment which resulted primarily from 
growers not planting their allotted acreage. 

Marketing of Burley in North Carolina 

The first North Carolina burley tobacco market was estab- 
lished at Asheville in 1930 through a movement started by the 
Farmers Federation in cooperation with the Asheville Chamber 
of Commerce. Money was raised from the farmers of Buncombe 




Curing bulk) lobajLu, grown in Western North Carolina, calls for a 
different process from the one used in curing bright leaf tobacco in the 
eastern and central counties. Burley is cured in open barns, like the one 
above, and nature does the curing with air. Down east and in the Pied- 
mont tobacco is cured in barns heated by wood, coal or oil. 



County and businessmen of Asheville to ei-ect one tobacco ware- 
house that operated for the first time during the 1930-31 market- 
ing season, selling 2,959,434 pounds of tobacco that year. 
Through many struggles and much hard work, the Asheville 
market managed to survive and grow. During the 1951-52 sea- 
son it sold 8,607,149 pounds of tobacco. 

Marketing facilities for hurley tobacco were expanded further 
in 1939 when a market was opened at Boone, and again in 1947 
when the market at West Jefferson was opened. These markets 
are a great convenience to Western North Carolina farmers and 
save them many dollars in hauling bills each year. 

The burley marketing season is rather short. It usually opens 
late in November, or not later than the first Monday in Decem- 
ber. Then a marketing holiday of about two and one-half weeks 
is called for Christmas and the marketing season is usually com- 
pleted during the latter part of January. 

The following table of producer sales and average prices 
shows progress made in burley marketing in North Carolina 
since 1940: 



Year 


Pounds 


Average 


rounds 


Average 


Pounds 


Average 


1940 


2.819.008 


18.41 


861.046 


18.75 






1945 


9.022,469 


40.22 


4,988.170 


35.36 






1946 


7.649,906 


43.37 


4.253,082 


38.16 






1947 


8,194,580 


45.82 


3,731,756 


38.63 


1.258.981 


35.10 


194S 


9.037.416 


48.72 


4,409.582 


44.27 


2.659,764 


43.75 


1949 


7,966,472 


43.43 


3,333,726 


42.48 


1,043,885 


44.41 


1950 


8.163,587 


53.96 


2,045,960 


46.97 


2.342.084 


46.23 


1951 


8,607,149 


54.77 


3,541,398 


.53.85 


4.180,436 


53.30 



North Carolina's marketing facilities for burley tobacco have 
expanded considerably since 1940, and the volume of sales has 
increased tremendously. However, the volume of tobacco sold 
on North Carolina markets in recent years has been affected by 
the increasing amount being moved to markets in neighboring 
states. Each year the volume of tobacco moving across state 
lines into North Carolina markets is becoming smaller and the 
volume of tobacco moving from North Carolina to out-of-state 
markets is becoming larger. 



Bur 

States 


cy Tol)acc() Movement in and out of Xortli Carolina 

1948-W IQ'tO-I'JSO 1<(50-51 
Sold in N.C. Tab. Sold Sold in N.C. Tob. Sold Sold in N.C. Tob. Sold 
N.C. out-of-slatc N.C. out-of-state N.C. oul-of-slatt 


Ohio 

Georgia 5.614 

South Carolina 6,658 

Tennessee 2,033.746 

Virginia 1.756,010 

W, Va. 10.078 

Kentucl<y 


4.900,304 
14.330 

26.325 


974 

25.367 

3,964 

1,617,878 

1,065,312 

4,114 


14,928 

3,010 

4,488,131 060,723 

22,042 726.488 

3,522 


5.915,598 
24,060 

43,052 


Totals 


3..S12.70(i 


4.040,939 


2,717,000 


4,510.173 1.408.671 


5,982,710 



The warehouse charges for seUing tobacco on North CaroHna 
hurley markets are generally more favorable to the growers 
than the charges made on many of the markets in bordering 
states. 

The following table compares the charges made on several 
markets in bordering states in 1950, with charges made on 
North Carolina markets; 

Charges 1950-1951 Season 

Market Auction Fee Commission 

Morristown. Tenn. SO^ per 100 pounds 4% 

Johnson City. Tenn. .50!» per 100 pounds 3% 

Greenville. Tenn. oOf per 100 pounds 3% 

Knoxville. Tenn. .50(' per 100 pounds 3% 

Mountain City, Tenn. 2.5i? per basket 4% 

ABingdon. Va. 25i per basket 3% 

Asheville, N. C. 25# per basket 3%% 

Boone, N. C. 25(? per basket 3%% 

W. Jeflferson. N. C. 25f per basket 3%% 

Using the charges listed for markets in the preceding tables 
the total charges for selling 220, 420, and 620 pound baskets, 
based on a price of $50.00 and .$30.00 per hundred pounds, are 
shown: 

Total Charges 

Based on $50.00 per cwt. 

Market 220 lb. Basket •120 lb. Basket 620 lb. Basket 

Morristown $ 5.50 $10.50 .$15.50 

.lohnson Citv 4.40 8.40 12.40 

Greenville 4.40 8.40 12.40 

Knoxville 4.40 8.40 12.40 

Mountain City 4.65 8.65 12.65 

Abingdon 3.55 6.55 9.55 

A,sheville 4.10 7.60 11.10 

Boone 4.10 7.60 11.10 

W. Jefferson 4.10 7,60 11.10 

Based on $30.00 per cwt. 

Market 220 lb. Basket 420 lb. Basket 620 lb. Basket 

Morristown $3,74 S 7.14 $10.54 

Johnson Citv 3.08 5,88 8.68 

Greenville 3.08 5,88 8.68 

Knoxville 3.08 5,88 8.68 

Mountain Citv 2.89 5.29 7.69 

Abingdon __" 2.13 4.03 5.83 

Asheville 2.36 4,66 6,51 

Boone 2.56 4.66 fi..il 

W. Jefferson 2.56 4,66 6.51 

It is evident from the foregoing table that it would be to the 
grower's advantage, in most cases, to sell his tobacco on North 
Carolina markets, if he finds sufficient facilities and services 
available on these markets for the orderly marketing of his crop. 
The average grower considers the unbiased services rendered 
him by the warehousemen more important than the charges, and 
he usually sells his tobacco with the warehouseman that gives 
the desired service, even if he has to go out of the state to find it. 

11 



Under North Carolina Laws, as amended in 1!)41. hurley ware- 
house operators can charge a maximum of 4 per cent commis- 
sion, but the warehousemen agreed in 1949 to reduce their 
commission to 0^2 per cent, and 25 cents per basket for auction 
fee, which is a favorable charge compared with average charges 
made on competing markets. 



12 



North Carolina Tobacco Crops 1919-1951 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1000 lbs.) 


(1000 Dollars) 


Price 






FLUE-CURED 






1919 


521,500 


612 


319.276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621.900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246.540 


60.402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271.170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396.354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276.819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


192G 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100.414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688.500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85.530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117.999 


23.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116.418 


20.30 


193G 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101.856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143.058 


24.00 


1938 


603.500 


844 


509,470 


115.428 


22.70 


1939 


843.000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498.000 


1.038 


516.835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488.000 


928 


452.825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539.000 


1,052 


.566.810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580.000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722.000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


194G 


802.000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783.000 


1,139 


892,205 


374.513 


42.00 


1948 


.594.000 


1,239 


739,380 


368.040 


49.80 


1949 


B21.00U 


1,178 


731,530 


352.685 


48.20 


1950 


U40.0U0 


1,341 


858,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735.000 


1.303 


958,050 


532. 952 •• 


53.75** 






BURLEY LIGHT AIR-CURED 






1934 


5.,-)00 


870 


4.785 


•S 809 


S17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4.810 


1.025 


21.30 


193G 


6.000 


900 


5,400 


2.095 


38.80 


1937 


9.000 


975 


8.775 


1.787 


21.40 


1938 


8.600 


900 


7.740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


S.IOO 


1.070 


8.667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6.500 


1.050 


6.825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6.200 


1.075 


6.665 


2.093 


31.40 


1942 


6.600 


1.150 


7.. 590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8.500 


1.225 


10,412 


5.102 


49.00 


1944 


12.000 


1.390 


1U.680 


8.1.57 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7.468 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1.475 


14.455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9.600 


1,560 


14,976 


6.335 


42.30 


1948 


10.300 


1.680 


17,304 


8.012 


46,30 


1949 


10.800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10.500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12.100 


1,700 


20,570 


11,149«» 


54.20* • 



♦Source: N. C. and U.S.D.A. Crop Reporting Service. 
•Estimate of Division of Markets based on Producers Sales. 



State Summary -1951-52 

New records in volume of sales and value were established for the 1951 
crop of flue-cured tobacco. However, the season's average price was below the 
record high average made in 1950 because of poorer quality of offerings. 

The 1951 flue-cured marketing season in North Carolina, which covered a 
jieriod of 97 sale days, was concluded on December 19, with 44 markets 
operating during the season. These markets sold a record of 952,035,210 
pounds of farmers' tobacco for the record sum of $512,773,475. This gave the 
growers a season average of $53.86 per hundred pounds, which was $2.22 
below the record high average of $56.08 received the previous year for 
836,400,256 pounds of producers' tobacco. 

Type 13 — The North Carolina Border Belt started the 1951 marketing 
season on August 2 with full sales on all markets. After the opening day sales 
were light for the next week or ten days, because growers were still harvesting 
their crops, which were late maturing due to a dry growing season. The 
eight North Carolina markets operating in this belt sold 169,019,498 pounds 
of producers' tobacco for a total of $90,060,024, which gave them a season 
average of $53.28 per hundred pounds. Producer sales for the previous year 
amounted to 140,798,849 pounds which sold for a record high average of 
$56.99 per hundred. The season of 64 sale days was completed on October 31 
with the closing of markets at Fairmont and Lumberton. Last year this belt 
operated for only 53 days. 

Type 12 — The seventeen Eastern Belt markets opened for the season on 
August 21, with average prices well below the 1^50 record prices. However, 
prices advanced as the season progressed and, by mid-season, the average prices 
paid for most medium and good grades were up $2.00 to $6.00 per hundred 
pounds over last year's averages. The percentage of common leaf and non- 
descript offered for sale was practically double that of the previous year, which 
accounts for the overall decline in the average price for the season. CJrowers 
in this beh received $270,653,037 in 1951 for 486,806,521 pounds of tobacco, 
averaging $55.56 per hundred. Last year they averaged $56.40 per hundred for 
405,056,236 pounds. Final sales were held in the Eastern Belt on November 30 
with a season of 71 sales days as compared with 60 days the previous year. 

Type IIB— The five markets in the southern area of the Middle Belt opened 
on August 30, and the other five markets in the northern area of the Belt 
held their first sales on September 4. The value of the 1951 crop of Middle 
Belt tobacco was the greatest in history. This was the result of an increase in 
volume of more than 13 million pounds over last year, plus an increase in 
average price for many of the better grades. Season sales of producers' tobacco 
in this belt reached 170,781,145 pounds, returning the growers $92,680,680, 
which is a season average of $54.27. Comparative figures for the previous 
year show that growers sold 157,641,536 pounds for $89,114,600, averaging 
$56.53 per hundred pounds. The season ended with the closing of the Fuquay- 
Varina market on December 7, which gave this belt W sale days this season 
compared with 57 in 1950. 

Type 11 A — Auction sales on the Old Belt markets started on September 17 
with light sales throughout the first three weeks because of the extremely dry 
weather, which made it difficult for growers to get their tobacco in case. 

14 



Average prices paid for many grades during the season were higher than 
the previous year, but the general average declined be;ause ot poorer qua ity 
of offerings Producer sales totaled about 7.5 million pounds less than last 
season Growers selling tobacco on the nine North Carolina Old Belt markets 
received $59,379,734 for 125,428,046 pounds, giving them a season average ot 
S47 34 per hundred pounds. The previous season producers averaged |52.11 
per' hundred for 132,907,635 pounds of tobacco. The Old Belt marketing 
season, which ended on December 19, covered a period of 66 selling days. 

The basic daily sale hours in all flue-cured belts were adjusted from time 
to time during the marketing season so as to regulate the volume of sales 
with the capacity of redrying plants. During the 1950 season redrying plants 
became congested, which resulted in a marketing holiday of four selling days 
to let redrying plants catch up. 

Type 31— North Carolina Burley markets in Asheville, Boone and West 
Jefferson opened the 1951-52 season on November 27, which was the earliest 
opening on record. The season was highlighted by higher average prices by 
grades and better quality, as compared with the 1950 season. Burley growers 
sold 16,334,983 pounds of tobacco on the three North Carolina markets for 
18,860,887, which gave them a record high average of $54.24 per hundred, 
breaking last year's record average by $2.86. Growers averaged $51.38 for the 
12,551,631 pounds sold during the 1950-51 season. 




,i*ig5l&W^-iP' 



Tobacco blending and redrying machine. Properly 
needs little rehandling in the proces.sing plants. 



sorted tobacco 



15 



' CO ■* cc w Oi ( 



■j; rf lo CO ^ CO o ; 



I LO lO iQ LO lO »C I 









e 
o 

M 

o 
« 



o 
a. 

V 

a: 



a 
I/I 



^ lo rH c^ a ( 



^ lo lo »o 10 lO ira lo lo ' 



'-^mcMi^oo:o;DciM'-^netOr-tt-T 

X TT CD ira 00 t-; 'a- Oi 10 M i-; O t'; lO M i-J *. 

« o: [^ lo' ^ ^* X c f' <N ■^' 'H c: o ^ ^ a 



Jt^t^l^r-lOCOCOl 



Ot^O^O-CDTrOOCOOOOOO' 

io^coc:«oi^'0:£!>-<Mi--t*( 



eg ,-H Tt r^ o ■ 



V 

o 



o 
H 

o 
e 



o 

u 



o 

z 



CC CO 10 O O ■-' ( 

Oi -^p c; ^_ c: a; 1 

i-H N oj -rj-' d (N ( 

lO lO 10 lO 10 lO I 



o c; ^ :o ID CO ■ 



I a o CD w o ' 



(Nt*coc^»or^co'© 

Tf to <N c; r-* LO ^ as 
h^ d d th d d i> 10 



= te ^ = o .•£■ ii 

S 2 S ? - »; ■- 

€ ? " I S I 5 .$ 

5 S -i ~ 5- § ^ g 



--' rr ^ CO 10 1 



Oi 10 c; o T-" I 






lO^CDClOOiOCO^lOCOOCCOO 

- — — -' '00'-''-'CDr-co^- 
1 CO Oi CO CD 03 in n ^ 

I ^' d lO lo' •^' d c; CO 

,_. --jr-Nt-Ti'MOliOCD _ 

icoxcD-^xxior-co^-c:r-c:a 



I r-. CO r- <- ; 






i 2 = 1 1 I I 



^ c c 

< o a t a 



■3 0,"=:= ■ 
tn t- cj £ a> ^ c 






■ r-t ^ ■-:*■ O ( 



I l> CD r- O CD CD 



CO "* lO Oi o CO t> I 



T uu Tf h-' lO' CO -** IC lO ( 
■■^f-OiCOCO'-'OONI 



I CD CO CO ^ C^ 

I o: i> oc r- 10 
1 cd' o in i> lo 



•H o 
l> CD 

cd' r-T 



COOCM'-'rfOCllOCDiO 

,c^r-cD'-;.r-t~cDXiocD 
Qo a; co' c^* eg' a: co cd' ai co' 

10 ^ to 01 00 "^ CD C^ lO 00 
OO-Ht-^t-OOCOOlOO 
O CD t--' W ■^' OO' d 00 O 1-H 



CD 


s 


lils 


i< § to 

CO 05 I- 


CO 


o 


278 
472 
686 
412 


-H c^ -T 

to ^ ^ 


o; 


lO 


00 lO ^ Cv| 


CO CO t^ 



r^lOTHCOTTCOrHlOM' 
'CJ^JOOCOCOCOOI 



' O O -rr CD 3! O O ( 

CD r^ --i tt 00 CO --I ( 

O; t^ 00 o O f* CO I 

■ 00 t^ C^ 00 d t^ O; ( 

CD CD CD l> O CO CO i 



t- O ■^ h- Tf I 



CD CD f- h- ! 



O lO I 



r- 1-- o o 03 I 



CD O CD O 00 
0j05C*J0i^0SCDCD'-i 
^ co' lO' CD* CO OS ■^' 1-1 01 ■^' 

■<r es o* lO 01 t-_ Tj- cQ 0:1 05 

'o' 16 « ci rH 10' ai cd Oi d 

^ CO cj eg --< 



CD O O ■* 01 O ■ 



I -r CO 00 CD CD 



§ ^ 






cr c *5 . 






<u 



) Cfi 



J,X1 c 



: - > o > 2 



Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales — 1951-52 



Resale Pounds 



Dealer 



6.442.512 
5,168,488 
2,032,706 
8,172,883 
6.881,301 



Warehouse 



Tolal 






N. C. Border Belt Type 13 

8,640,940 10,167,002 18,807,942 i«3,780,31.-i 

N. C. Eastern Belt Type 12 

14,681,374 25,625,976 40,307,350 6.280.426 13,430.46 

N. C. Middle Belt Type IIB 

9,196,234 15,638,746 2,772,870 

N. C. Old Belt Type llA 

7,818.780 12.987,268 2,170,887 

N. C. Burley Belt Type 31 

1,708,0,52 3,740,758 1,028,2,56 

S. C. Type 13 
8,351,062 16,523,945 3,562.792 

Georgia Type 14 
6,939,01(i 13,820,317 2,992,704 

Florida Type 14 
2,190.0,56 

Virginia Type llA 
12,803,156 



85,327,459 89,107,774 



4,823,712 
3,683,288 
866,051 
4.093,037 
3,132,328 



Stabilization Receipts By Belts 1951 

PRODUCERS' SALES CROSS SALES 

STATE "^ 

Pounds Average Price Pounds Average Price 

N C 952,035,210 $53.86 l,039,776,51(i *52?§ 

v"a — :::::: 160,955,996 53,59 n^-l^H^i ?H^ 

s c.":::: 154:504,1.38 .51.44 WAl^ifi f^i 

r'a 155.053.010 45.70 168.873,327 45.59 

rfa. '::::::;::::: 20,807:570 .-.2.08 22.997.626 .51^ 

Total 1,443,355,924 52.66 1.576,434,704 5 2,22 

Total Sales of Type 11-14 F lue-Cured 19 51 

Producers' Sale Sl-ibiliMlion Percenlage 

j,„ Type (lbs.) Receipts (lbs.) Slab. Received 

Old Rplt llA 286,384,042 44.874.646 15.7 

Mfdd^I'Veit -;:::::::::;: iib "0'J«1'»5 y^^1S2 li 

Eastern Belt 12 !*§§'§§§■??/, ^«'s3Rm6 11 1 

sj P Rnrripr Belt 13 323,o23,63(i 3,j,83»,Ulli I'l 

Oa, Fla. BeTl . '.VZ-V-V- 14 175.860.580 17.082.165 JK^ 

Total 11-14 1,443,3.55,924 142,243,742 9.8 

18 



North Carolina Tobacco Allotments — 1952' 

Flue-Cured 



County No. Farmsz 

Alamance 1,320 

Alexander 967 

Anson 211 

Beaufort 2,644 

Bertie 1.723 

Bladen 3.473 

Brunswick 1.762 

Caldwell 247 

Camden 2 

Carteret 439 

Caswell 1.926 

Catawba 5 

Chatham 1.177 

Chowan 186 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 5.497 

Craven 1,886 

Cumberland 2.467 

Currituck 1 

Davidson 1.694 

Davie 907 

Duplin 4,845 

Durham 1,063 

Edgecombe 1.593 

Forsvth 2.211 

Franklin 2.849 

Gaston 4 

Gates 115 

Granville 2.113 

Greene 1.147 

Guilford 3.167 

Halifax 2.140 

Harnett 3.837 

Hertford 1.052 

Hoke 994 

Hvde 8 

Iredell 805 

Johnston 5.924 

Jones 940 

Lee 1.348 

Lenoir 1.911 

Martin ' 1,648 

Mecklenburg 11 

Montgomery 401 

Moore 1.535 

Nash 3,011 

New Hanover 86 

Northampton 180 

Onslow 1.875 

Orange 929 

Pamlico 448 

Pasquotank : 1 

Pender 1.596 

Person 1.743 

Pitt 2.674 

Randolph 1.581 

Richmond 961 

Roberson 4.904 

Rockingham 3.026 

Rowan 33 

Sampson 5,767 

Scotland 474 

Stokes 2,749 

Surrv 3,165 

Tvrell 1 

Vance 1 537 

Wake 3.940 

Warren 1,944 

Washington 2'<5 

Wavne 2,984 

Wilkes 937 

Wilson 2,178 ' 

Yadkin 2,669 

Total 121,907 



7,502.0 

2,319.7 

578.1 

15,014.3 

8.956.9 

11.654.2 

5.108.9 

748.0 

6.3 



2.4 

5,372.6 

2,134.2 

24.220.2 

6.179.1 

18,120.7 

8,130.3 

18,013.8 

7.5 

422.0 

20.987.8 

18,937.2 

14,723.9 

9,276.5 

22.668.9 

5.106.6 

4.443.5 

11.2 

2.035.3 

35,614.6 

8.544.0 

6.445.0 

21.946.9 

13.383.1 

4.0 

1.496.6 

7.156.8 

28,626.8 

299.4 

690.7 

9.830.5 

5.271.4 

1,708.1 

0.3 

5.018.0 

15.116.4 

39.865.8 

5.287.3 

3.168.6 

32.304.2 

20.559.6 

83.5 

23.921.4 

1.764.0 

18.083.7 

17.235.8 

1.3 

12.780.7 

30.577.9 

9.652.9 

1.488.4 

22.817.5 

2,424.0 

26.483.3 

12,765.7 



19 



Biirley 

County ^"^ f"'"'« 

Alexander 3 „.y| 

Alleghany 393 247.8 



1,231.7 

123.7 

2.203.2 



Ashe !•' ^ 

Avery 1»| 

Buncombe ■'■"^^ 

Burke „J1 ,52 

Caldwell 2fa 13.8 

Catawba „5 P7S 

Cherokee 133 g^.o 

Clay ^^o 1 7 

Cleveland ^ 42 

Davidson / j'o 

Durham i 16 

Gaston ggg 3339 

Graham g°3 1 .,55 

Haywood ^•°°" 50 

Henderson 'r, jj 

Iredell 214 117^0 

Jackson "i, in 

McDowell .°] 04:2 

Macon 3 jj4 3.912.6 

Madison •'■'^o 10 

Mecklenburg „„^ 605.7 

Mitchell **''y 06 

Polk 1 0.6 

Randolph -q 329 

Rutherford jog 5S ,5 

Swain -. 58 39.8 

Transylvania ^ .% I.OOO.O 

Watauga ^'^JS 2.3 

Wilkes .^853 1.517.6 

Yancey 

Total "^6^ ^'■'''■' 

.Source: U. S. Production and Marketing Administration 
jDoes not include new growers for 19.52 



20 



Norl-h Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 
Operal-ors by Belts and Markets — 1951 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Carters No. 1 & 2— J. C. Green, H. Perry, Joe Bryant 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
New Brick— W. C. Coats, Jr. 
New Farmers — O. L. Littleton 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Banners — B. F. Rivenbark, J. H. Bryant 

Bright Leaf— B. F. Rivenbark, J. H. Bryant 

New Bladen— H. M. Clark, M. L. Fisher, E. L. Dudley 

Big L— H. M. Clark, M. L. Fisher, E. L. Dudley 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell — A. H. Powell, A. L. Carver 

Planters — N. N. Love 

Littleton's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big 5— E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Roberson County — E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Peoples — E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves Co. 

Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Mitchell-Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Big Brick— F. P. Joyce, J. A. Pell 

Farmers — F. P. Joyce, J. A. Pell 

Dixie— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. HoUiday 

Frye No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. HolUday 

HoUiday— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. HoUiday 

Planters No. 1 — G. R. Royster 

Square Deal — W. G. Bassett 

Star-Carolina— T. S. Booker, C. A. Blankenship, W. G. Sheets, 

A. A. Fowler 
Twin State— P. R. Floyd, Jr., R. j. Harris, Paul Wilson 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Rig Farmers — R. H. Barbour, P. L. Campbell 
Wellons — ). W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Britts— J. R. Musgrove, W. & C. ChafFin, J. S. Walden, Jr. 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend 

Dixie — N. A. McKeithan, J. A. Kinlow, E. K. Biggs 

Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, ]. K. Roycroft, R. L. Rollins 

Liberty— R. E. Wilkens, F. S. White, R. H. Livenmore, H. D. Goode 

Smith— T. J. Smith, Paul Sands, H. P. Allen 

Bass — Taft Bass, Clellan Prewitt 



2'1 



Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina— R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers— R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriett Sikes 
Carrells— C;. R. & C. E. Walden 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Brooks— L. H. 6^ Blair Motley 

Motley— L. H. & Blair Motley 

Crutchfield— C;. E. & R. W. Crutchfteld 

Lea's No. 1 — \Vm. Townes Lea 

Moores — A. H. Moore 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Perkins-Newman— H. L. & J. 'W. Perkins, N. C. Newman 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, [r., I. W. Peay 

Tuggles— A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Farmers— A. Dial Gray, ]. L. Neal 

Columbus County— A. Dial (iray, [. L. Neal 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight No. 1 & 2— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veacey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. D. Odom, E. R. Evans 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Big Sampson— Z. D. McWhorter, Ennis Bass, CJ. S. Strickland 

Carolina— Z. D. McWhorter, Ennis Bass, G. S. Strickland 

Center Brick — (iuy R. Ross 

Ross No. 2— Guy R. Ross 

Farmers— Hubert & Joe Carr, John Chestnut 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — \. B. & J. M. Currin, O. C. Calhoun, T. B. Smothers 
Farmers — J. R. Owens, Billy Celsor 
Growers— J. R. Owens, Billy Celsor 

Farmville ( two sets buyers ) 

Bell's— L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey & Bros. 

Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Fountains — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 

Monks No. 1 & 2— J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse, J. C:. Carlton, C Webb 

Planters — M. J. Moye, Chester Worthington 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina— S. G. Best, Bruce Smith, J. 1. Musgravc 

Farmers No. 1— S. B. Hill, Carl HoUonian, W. M. Rouse, H. Hcntnn 

Tin — J. I. Musgrave 

Victory — J. B. Scott 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 
Cannon — W. T. Cannon 

Center Brick— M. D. Lassitcr, M. M. Hassel, W. S. Edwards 
Oixie— M. D. Lassiter, M. M. Hassel, W. S. Edwards 



Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Orowers — Woodrow Worthington 

Harris-Rogers — R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 

Keel's Coop. — J. T. Keel, Mgr. 

McGowans No. 1 & 2— C. H. McCiowan 

Morton's — W. Z. Morton 

Empire — W. Z. Morton 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McCJowaii 

Star No. 1 & 2— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 

Gold Leaf— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 

Victory— Guy & H. Forbes, O. L. Joyner, Jr. 

Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Brooks — J. R. & Fred Brooks 
Central— J. E. Jones, C. W. Wooten 
Eagle — W. H. Jones, Lula B. Jones 
New Carolina — W. H. Jones, Lula B. Jones 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins, L. E. Pollock 
Kinston Coop.— D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc.— K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knotts New— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — W. M. Wickham 
Planters — L. O. Stokes, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2 — R. E. Sheppard 
Tapps— H. F. Laws, Mgr. 
The Star Warehouse— C. J. Herring 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 
Adkins & Bailey— I. M. Litde 
New Red Front — J. H. Gray 
Planters No. 1 & 2 — H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount ( four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Foxhall No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, H. P. Foxhall 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — Bernard Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2 — James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc.— H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — T. A. Williams, Mgr. 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — Dorothy Carter, J. B. Wooten, E. H. \'alentinc 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — N. L. Daughtery, G. G. yVdams, W. L. Kennedy 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 

Little Dixie — Jack Broadhurst 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence, Dixon St Holton Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2 — H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 



Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. L. House, ). P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Clipp Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) , „, ,, ^ 

Blanchard & Farrior-O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farnor 
Hussey No. 1 & 3— W. L. Hussey 

Washington (one set buyers) 

CJravely's— H. C. Gravely & Sons 

Knotts— I. P. Bishop, C. P. Brewer 

Sermons No. 1 & 2-W. I. Sermons, ). L. Roberson 

Wendell (two sets buyers) 

Banners No. 1 & 2—1. W. Dale, Jr., Mgr. 
Farmers— L. R. Clark & Son 
Northside— G. Dean, E. H. Price & Sanders 
Planters— G. Dean, E. H. Price & Sanders 
Liberty— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin 
Star A & B— J. S. Benard, C. Walker 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Banners— A. W. Fleming & Sons 

Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, R. P. Dew, W. C. Thompson 

Big Star— J. }. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Carolina— G. L. Wainwright 

Wainwright— G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 2 & 3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers— J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Coop.— S. E. Griffin, Mgr. . ^ „ „, ^ 

New Planters No. 1 & 2-R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc. A, B & C-H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson— H. W. & S. W. Anderson 

Williamston (one set buyers) , .„ , „ t- , c i n 

Carolina-S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnh.ll, J. B. Taylor, ELiUey 
Farmer-S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters— J. W. Gurkin 
Roanoke-Dixie— J. W. Gurkin 

Windsor ( set of buyers incomplete) 
Farmers— S. F. & J. F. Hicks 
Rogers— R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen— R. W. Hancy 
Planters— E. B. Maynard 

Carthage ( one set buyers) 

McConnells— W. M. & G. D. Carter 
Smothers No. 1 & 2— H. P. & R. D. Smothers 
Victory— D. T. Bailey, R. L. Comer 

24 



Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John & Walker Stone, Clyde Roberts 
Mangum — S. T. Mangum, I. E. Satterfield 
Planters — |. M. Talley 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 
Star-Brick — A. L. Carver 

Ellerbe (set of buyers incomplete) 

Farmers — Geo. Mabe, L. G. Dewitt, Monroe Fagg 
Richmond County— H. G. Perry, Joe Wallace, J. H. Bryant 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Centeral— S. T. Proctor, P. L. Campbell, R. H. Barbour 
New Deal — King Roberts, E. E. Clayton, H. H. Smith 
Planters— W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 
Talley Bros.— W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Varina-Brick — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Carohna— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Moore's Big Henderson— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B — Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner— W. L. Mitchell 

Mitchell— W. L. Mitchell 

Farmers— S. T. Currin, B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock 

Mangum — S. T. Currin, B. T. Williams, Julian Adcock 

Fleming No. 1 & 2 — G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin. H. G. Taylor 

Planters— C. R. Watkins 

Johnson — C. R. Watkins 

Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford — Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Wilkens — Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Farmers Flag— C. W. Puckett, F. L. McCallum 
Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 
Center — M. P. Carroll, C. E. Thompson 
Currin's — D. G. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 

25 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina— R. D. Tickle, H. L. Perkins, J. G. McCary 
Coble— N. C. Newman, Elton Hughes, H. L. Johnson 
Farmers— O. H. King, C. R. McCauley, R. W. Rainery 

Greensboro (set of buyers incomplete) 

CJreensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co.— R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
(iuilford County Warehouse Co.— J. R. Pell, Mgr. 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster, R. G. Angell 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster, R. G. Angell 
Sharp & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Farmers— R. L. Dale, E. L. Dudley 

Piedmont— J. F. McCauley, I. C. Farabow, I. D. Wood 

Planters— W. J. DiUard, J. B. Keck, I- H. Warren 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 
New Dixie — Bludgett 

Liberty— R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin 
Simmons— R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin 
Nichols— E. F. & R. J. Lovill, F. Nichols, W. H. Brown 
Va.-Carolina— E. F. & R. J. Lovill, F. Nichols, W. H. Brown 
LoviUs— E. F. & R. J. Lovill, F. Nichols, W. H. Brown 
Planters & Jones— Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 

Reidsville (one set buyers) r^ , , „- 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, R. Roberts, D. Hufhnes 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, R. Roberts, D. Huffines 
Leader— A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pinnix 
Watts— A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pinnix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers— Lindsay Wagstaf?, R. L. Hester 

Hyco— W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester 

Pioneer— H. W. Winstead, Jr., ]. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitheld 

Planters No. 1 & 2— T. O. Pass 

Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2— O. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers— F. A. Brown, P. M. Mooretield 
Piedmont— J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 
Slate Brothers No. 1 & 2— B. R. & B. M. Slate 

26 



Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 
Dixie— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell 
Farmers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell 
Glenn & Banner Co. — C. T. Glenn 
Liberty— R. T. & R. F. Carter, M. M. Joyner 
Pepper No. 1 & 2 — F. D. Pepper 
Piedmont— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland 
Planters — Foss Smithdeal 
Taylor — Paul Taylor, J. H. Dyer 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 

Farmers Federation — Max Roberts, Mgr. 

Mt. Burley — Max Roberts, Mgr. 

Dixie No. 1 & 2 — Taft Bass 

Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart, Fred D. Cockfield 

Bernard — Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — R. C. Coloman 
Farmers Burley — R. C. Coloman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley — C. C. Taylor 
Planters — E. L. Dudley, R. L. Dale 



27 



Turkish Tobacco in North Carolina 

The production of aromatic tobacco in North CaroUna is still 
in its infancy, but through the efforts of the State Extension 
Service and the Experiment Stations it is rapidly being develop- 
ed into an important crop in many sections of the State. 

The demand for aromatic tobacco has steadily increased dur- 
ing the past several years with the increase in consumption of 
blended cigarettes in this country. At present, domestic manu- 
facturers depend upon foreign markets, largely in Turkey and 
Greece, to supply about 55 to 60 million pounds of aromatic 
tobacco annually to meet the demand. The production of blend- 
ed cigarettes in the United States reached an all time high of 
419 billion pieces during 1951, and approximately 10 per cent 
of the average domestic blend is aromatic tobacco. Thus, 
domestic growers who produce a good quality aromatic tobacco 
should find a strong market awaiting their product. 

For the past few years the Southeastern Aromatic Tobacco 
Company, Anderson, S. C, has provided a market for domesti- 
cally grown aromatic tobacco. 

The following table gives a summary of the 1949, 1950 and 
1951 crops of aromatic tobacco in North Carolina: 

1949 r95() 1951 

Number of acres 37 130 oO 

Number of counties IjJ ,2° _ 

Number of growers lljA ^*« 755 

Average yieW per acre (pounds > 1.034 153703 37.789 

Gross sales (pounds) gir^J «7i 9r WOOO 

Average price per hundred pounds $84.ol S.71.2t, s.iu.uu 

The sharp drop in number of growers and production for 
1951 does not reflect a true picture of the progress being made 
with aromatic tobacco in North Carolina. The big increase in 
number of growers and production in 1950 was stimulated by 
the high prices paid for the 1949 crop. However, in 1950 many 
of the new growers were not prepared to grow aromatic tobacco, 
and the curing season was unfavorable for sun curing the crop, 
which resulted in a large volume of poor quality tobacco. 

This situation caused a sharp drop in the average price re- 
ceived for the 1950 crop, and the new growers who were not 
prepared to handle aromatic tobacco discontinued it after the 
first year. Although the size of the 1951 crop was much smaller 
than the previous year, the progress made in producing quality 

•Croii data cunlribulfd by Ihi- .Slale Extension Service. 

28 



tobacco was outstanding. With new metiiods of liandling tlie 
crop, production will probably increase at a rapid pace during 
the next few years. 

The quality of aromatic tobacco produced in the State in 1951 
was the best since the crop was first introduced in 1945. The 
curing season was favorable in 1951, but the extremely dry 
growing season in the upper Piedmont area reduced the yield 
per acre by about 40 per cent. The normal yield per acre for 
the area is from 1,000 to 1,200 pounds. 

The development of new labor saving devices and methods 
of handling and curing the leaf will enable a family to take 




rill-, poitiible Tiiiki^h curing rack i-> tilk-d with tobacco whuli w a^ 
pi epared by stringing leaves one by one with a needle and then tying 
the strings to a stick. 

29 




A bale of N. C. Aromatic tobacco ready for market 



care of about four times more tobacco, and get a higher quality 
product. The large amount of labor required at harvest, using 
the conventional method of stringing leaves one by one with 
a needle and tying them to a stick, has been the main "bottle 
neck" in producing this type of tobacco. But with the new- 
method of using a 10 gauge galvanized wire, cut 27 inches long, 
the tobacco can be strung by the handful and one person can 
string as fast as three can prime. 

The new method of curing developed by aromatic tobacco 
specialists reduces labor and risk in curing during unfavorable 
weather. A curing barn 12 by 17 feet at the base and 10 feet high 
is designed to take care of approximately one acre of tobacco. 
A thermo.statically controlled oil furnace with forced air circula- 
tion supplies the hot air (100 degrees F), which is forced from 
the top down through the tobacco leaves. 

This type of barn makes it possible to go on curing tobacco 
at night and on rainy days. In the past, curing has been done 
entirely by sunlight, and during prolonged rainy and cloudy 
periods tlie tobacco was damaged by mold and barn-.scald. 

30 



Under the new arrangement, the tobacco is rolled out of the 
barn on portable racks and cured by the sun on sunny days. 
At night and on rainy days, it is rolled inside the barn and cur- 
ing is continued by the use of heat. Twelve to fifteen days are 
required to cure tobacco in the sun, and only six to eight days 
are required by the combination sun and heat method. Tobacco 
cured by this new method has been judged by tobacco experts 
to be of excellent quality. 

Thus, a new era in the production of Turkish tobacco in North 
Carolina is beginning to break, as old methods are replaced by 
modern labor-saving practices that will make the crop more 
profitable. 



Ml 



OUTLETS FOR U. S. TOBACCO 



BIL. LBS 



Cigarettes 

Cigars 

Smoking, chewing, snuff 

Exports 




1924-28 1934-38 1948 1949 1950 1951 
AV. AV. 



U. S. DEPARTMEN 



ttU-SALlS WEIGHT fOUIV/llENT 

NEC 4741S-KX BUREAU OF A8RICU LTURAl. ECONOMICS